Q&A with Dr. Wachtler

Why do I feel like I could sprain my ankle at any time?
This is usually caused by a high arch foot type, chronic ankle instability or both. A high arch foot type often causes pressure to the outside of one’s foot and makes it easier to roll the ankle. Ankle instability usually arises from ankle sprains which were reinjured without fully healing in the past. This is why it is important to have an ankle sprain treated promptly to avoid future injuries. If there is residual instability, different treatment options are also available to correct this issue.

Do I have to treat a plantar wart?
Yes. Although sometimes plantar warts resolve on their own with little intervention, this is less likely. More commonly, they stick around, become painful and can spread. There are many ways to treat warts; some are painful and some are not. Sometimes getting rid of a wart is a process, so starting sooner rather than later is helpful.

As a runner, do I have to stop running if I have achilles tendonitis?
Short answer–yes. Typical overuse injuries like achilles tendonitis are worsened by not allowing them to fulling recover before returning to activity. However, cross training and some other treatments can help to reduce down time.

Why does my heel hurt when I first get out of bed, but by the time I brush my teeth it feels better?
This is very typical of plantar fasciitis and is called post-static dyskinesia. This is when the ligament gets tighter while you are resting and then when you step down, the fascia needs to stretch and this pulling is painful. Many treatments exist for plantar fasciitis, with the most important being stretching.

How does Diabetes affect your feet?
Diabetes affects a lot of things, some of which include your eyes, kidneys and your feet. When diabetes affects your feet, it can damage your circulation and your nerves. Strict blood sugar control, daily foot checks, proper shoes and regular foot evaluations can help to prevent complications of diabetes.

To contact Dr. Wachtler, call the office at 973-857-1184 or visit www.CedarGroveFoot.com

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